The Status Value of Age and Gender: Modeling Combined Effects of Diffuse Status Characteristics
Author(s): Michael J. Lovaglia, Shane D. Soboroff, Christopher P. Kelley, Christabel L. Rogalin, Jeffrey W. Lucas
Abstract: PurposernTo determine the age at which influence peaks for men and women at work, then use empirical data to develop procedures predicting complex combining effects of diffuse status characteristics.rnMethodology/approachrnA survey experiment with a nationally representative sample is used to measure the age at which the status value of men and women at work reaches a maximum. Research results are then incorporated into equations adapted from current status characteristics theory (SCT) procedures to model the combined effects of age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, income, occupation, and beauty.rnFindingsrnAnalyses reveal that the status value of men and women reaches a maximum in middle age, and that women reach a maximum status value at work at an earlier age than men.rnResearch limitations/implicationsrnThis approach maintains core assumptions of SCT and uses ongoing research results to calibrate a model predicting complex combining effects of diffuse status characteristics. Limitations include the need to develop additional empirical constants to make predictions in new research settings.rnPractical implicationsrnPredictions from the model can be used in hiring situations to adjust for interviewers’ nonconscious expectations related to status characteristics of job applicants.rnSocial implicationsrnThe disadvantage for women at work that increases through mid-career helps to explain the continuing underrepresentation of women in senior leadership positions. Awareness of the impact of socially valued characteristics like age and gender can help individuals respond more effectively to challenging social situations.rnOriginality/valuernExtend the current SCT model to make predictions in contexts where people are being evaluated such as elections, hiring, and promotions.rn
Publication Title: Advances in Group Processes, Vol. 34
Pub Year: 2017
Pages: 81 – 101
URL: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/full/10.1108/S0882-614520170000
034004
Keywords: status characteristics, expectations, age, gender, mathematical models

Related Publications
Related publication for Keyword(s): status characteristics, expectations, age, gender, mathematical models