Contextual Influences on Interpersonal Complementarity
Author(s): D.S. Moskowitz, Moon-ho Ringo Ho, Anne-Marie Turcotte-Tremblay
Abstract: The influence of context on interpersonal complementarity was examined using an event-contingent recording procedure. Setting and role status moderated the relation between how a person behaved and how the other person behaved. Individuals were more likely to respond with agreeable behavior to agreeableness in others when not at work than when at work and when in a high status work role relative to a low status work role. Reciprocity between dominance and submissiveness was found in work settings but not in nonwork settings. Individuals were more likely to reciprocate more submissive behavior by the other person with more dominant behavior and more likely to reciprocate more dominant behavior by the other person with relatively more submissive behavior when in a higher status work role relative to lower status work roles. Results were interpreted in terms of the influence of decreased structure and shared goals on increasing interpersonal complementarity.
Publication Title: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Vol. 33(8), pg. 1051-1063
Pub Year: 2007
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146167207303024
Keywords: interpersonal behavior, interpersonal process, interpersonal complementarity, social-role status, dominance-submissiveness, agreeable behavior, quarrelsome behavior

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