The Destructive Nature of Power Without Status
Author(s): Nathanael J. Fast, Nir Halevy, Adam D. Galinsky
Abstract: The current research explores how roles that possess power but lack status influence behavior toward others. Past research has primarily examined the isolated effects of having either power or status, but we propose that power and status interact to affect interpersonal behavior. Based on the notions that a) low-status is threatening and aversive and b) power frees people to act on their internal states and feelings, we hypothesized that power without status fosters demeaning behaviors toward others. To test this idea, we orthogonally manipulated both power and status and gave participants the chance to select activities for their partners to perform. As predicted, individuals in high-power/low-status roles chose more demeaning activities for their partners (e.g., bark like a dog, say “I am filthy”) than did those in any other combination of power and status roles. We discuss how these results clarify, challenge, and advance the existing power and status literatures.
Publication Title: Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Vol. 48(1)
Pub Year: 2012
Pages: 391 – 394
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2011.07.013
Keywords: power, status, role, hostility, aggression

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